Police raid innocent family because of indoor garden, spied on their purchases and dug through trash – YouTube

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READ MORE: http://www.policestateusa.com/2014/harte-family-raid/ LEAWOOD, KS — Men with assault rifles raided a family who had been growing tomatoes and mel…

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The Extinction Crisis: Unlike past mass extinctions, caused by events like asteroid strikes, volcanic eruptions, and natural climate shifts, the current crisis is almost entirely caused by us.

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It’s frightening but true: Our planet is now in the midst of its sixth mass extinction of plants and animals — the sixth wave of extinctions in the past half-billion years. We’re currently experiencing the worst spate of species die-offs since the loss of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. Although extinction is a natural phenomenon, it occurs at a natural “background” rate of about one to five species per year. Scientists estimate we’re now losing species at 1,000 to 10,000 times the background rate, with literally dozens going extinct every day [1]. It could be a scary future indeed, with as many as 30 to 50 percent of all species possibly heading toward extinction by mid-century [2].

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Project Wild Thing – Reconnecting kids with nature – Project Wild Thing.

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Project Wild Thing is a film led movement to get more kids (and their folks!) outside and reconnecting with nature. The film is an ambitious, feature-length documentary that takes a funny and revealing look at a complex issue, the increasingly disparate connection between children and nature.

And Project Wild Thing is much more than a film, this is a growing movement of organisations and individuals who care deeply about the need for nature connected, free-range, roaming and outdoor playing kids in the 21st century. Hundreds of people have already committed huge amounts of time, energy, resources and money to help get the project where it is today. Which is really just the beginning.

The journey started in late 2010 with film-makers Green Lions exploring a film approach to an emerging issue coined ‘nature deficit disorder’ in kids. A collaboration formed with the National Trust who were also looking at the issue and through the Britdoc Foundation support for the development of the film and movement has gathered along the way from RSPB, Play England, Play Scotland, Play Wales, NHS Sustainable Development Unit, TFT, Woodland Trusts, AMV BBDO and Arla foods.

In summer 2012 Greenlions formed a collaboration with Good for Nothing, helping co-create the foundation of David Bond’s nature marketing program, this was supported by generous contributions from the Do Lectures, TYF Adventures, Eden Project and Al Kennedy.

In the autumn of 2012 the Natural Childhood Summit hosted by the National Trust brought together hundreds of organisations to explore the challenges and issues more widely and collaboratively.

Project Wild Thing emerged and thousands of people have pledged to support the project a year before the film has launched. A Kickstarter campaign raised further funding from hundreds of awesome individuals around the world to finish the film production.

In January 2013 Swarm Partnership came on board with support from the Esmee Fairbairn Foundation and The Wild Network was hatched. The network is an open, growing collaborative group of organisations big and small seeking to tackle the many issues raised in the film and champion the wonders of being outside. An advisory group was established with the WildLife Trusts currently heading that up.

Phew!

Project Wild Thing and The Wild Network is a people powered movement, it’s success will be down to the actions and the energy of this growing community.

If you want nature, wildness and free-range living for kids and adults to exist alongside an increasingly industrialised and technological society then join us and get involved in making that happen.

See you on the outside.

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#Japanese coastal whaling ‘will wipe out species’: Environmental Activists | The Raw Story.

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A London-based environmental group charged Thursday that Japan’s coastal whaling programme was on track to wipe out the marine mammals from local waters.

The number of whales being caught off the coast is on a steady decline, the Environmental Investigation Agency said, with fishermen having to travel further afield to find their targets.

“A comprehensive analysis of the available scientific data demonstrates unequivocally that there are grave concerns regarding the sustainability of these hunts,” said Sarah Baulch, the group’s cetaceans campaigner.

 

The campaigners looked at coastal whaling, which is distinct from Japan’s annual whale hunt in the Antarctic that draws international opprobrium and has seen Australia lodge a case with the International Court of Justice.

Small-time coastal whaling is allowed under the rules of the International Whaling Committee, which regards it as similar to that of communities engaged in aboriginal subsistence whaling elsewhere in the world.

The practice was brought to worldwide attention by the Oscar-winning anti-whaling documentary “The Cove”, which graphically depicted the slaughter of the animals in the small town of Taiji in Japan’s southwest.

The Japanese government has maintained that coastal whaling is the socio-economic foundation of fishing communities. But the argument does not wash in many Western countries, whose publics want it banned.

The outrage abroad, particularly the more extreme actions of militant campaigners in the Southern Ocean, has had the effect of making whaling a rallying cry for nationalists, who insist the desire to ban it is cultural imperialism.

The Environmental Investigation Agency, citing figures from the whaling industry, said the falling catch was indicative of a diminishing whale population, while charging the Japanese government is not carrying out proper surveys.

 

The group also charged that cruel methods employed in killing dolphins, whales and porpoises, in which they are chased a long way before being butchered, “likely” causes stress to the wider cetacean population.

The government should phase out the practice to allow the populations to recover while helping fishermen to find different jobs, it said.

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Jill Studholme – Google+ – Mysterious disease creates Zombie #Starfish

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Mysterious disease creates Zombie Starfish

Sick and dying starfish (sea stars) have appeared in a multitude of locations between Alaska and southern California. 

“It’s like a zombie wasteland,” says biologist Emily Tucker told Nature. “You’ll see detached arms crawling away from their  body.”

Called Sea Star Wasting Disease, it can cause the death of an infected starfish in just a few days. Its effects can be devastating on starfish populations. 

The disease has hit before, in southern California in 1983-1984 for example and again  in 1997-98. These events were associated with warmer sea temperatures. The current outbreak is more widespread. 

It is particularly worrying because one of the starfish affected, Pisaster ochraceus, was the original “keystone species”. This is a species  that has a disproportionately large effect on its environment relative to its abundance. Without it the ecosystem would be dramatically different. The concept was first proposed in 1969 usingPisaster ochraceus as a primary example.  Within a year of  Pisaster ochraceus being removed, biodiversity halved.

Lesions on the animal are the first signs of the disease. Tissue then decays around the lesions which leads to break up of the body and death.

There is a map of where diseased sea-stars have been found athttp://data.piscoweb.org/marine1/seastardisease.html

More information at 
http://www.eeb.ucsc.edu/pacificrockyintertidal/data-products/sea-star-wasting/index.html
http://www.nature.com/news/scientists-search-for-clues-in-sea-star-die-off-1.14370

#seastarwastingsyndrome   #starfish  

Photo credit: Steven Pavlov (CC BY-SA 3.0) 

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